START THE CLUSTER: when all cluster nodes are down use the #cmruncl command to start the cluster.

The command starts all nodes configured in the cluster and verifies the network information.

Use the -v (verbose) option to display the greatest number of messages.

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STOP/HALT ENTIRE CLUSTER: use #cmhaltcl to halt the entire cluster. This command causes all nodes in a configured cluster to halt their Serviceguard daemons.

#cmhaltcl -f -v

This halts all the cluster nodes.

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CHECK STATUS OF CLUSTER: #cmviewcl displays the current status information of a cluster in line output  format.

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ADDING PREVIOUSLY CONFIGURED NODES TO A RUNNING CLUSTER: use the #cmrunnode command to join one or more nodes to an already running cluster.

Any node you add must already be a part of the cluster configuration.

The -v (verbose) option prints out all the messages:

#cmrunnode -v [nodexx]
 
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REMOVING NODES FROM PARTICIPATION IN A RUNNING CLUSTER: you can use Serviceguard Manager, or Serviceguard commands as shown below, to remove nodes from active participation in a cluster.
This operation halts the cluster daemon, but it does not modify the cluster configuration.Halting a node is a convenient way of bringing it down for system maintenance while keeping its packages available on other nodes. After maintenance, the package can be returned to its primary node.
#cmhaltnode -f -v umhpuxsg9

Get current configuration
#cmgetconf – Get cluster or package configuration information:
you can use -c cluster_name   for a specific Name  of the cluster.

 
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MANAGING PACKAGES AND SERVICES: 
Running a package
# cmrunpkg [ -n <node name> ] <packag name>
This will run the package on the current node or on the node specified. Logs will be written in /etc/cmcluster/<SID>/<control_script>.log.
 
Halting a package:
# cmhaltpkg <packag name>
This will halt the package, Logs will be written in /etc/cmcluster/<packag name>/<control_script>.log.
 
enable or disable switching attributes for a cluster
# cmmodpkg –e/-d <packag name>
Enabling a package to run on a particular node
 
After a package has failed on one node, that node is disabled. This means the package will not be able to run on that node. The following command will enable the package to run on the specified node.
# cmmodpkg –e -n <node name> <package name>
 
Disabling a package from running on a particular node
# cmmodpkg-d-n <node name> <packag name>
This will command will disable the package to run on the specified node.
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MOVING A FAILOVER PACKAGE: 
 

Before you move a failover package to a new node, it is a good idea to run #cmviewcl -v -l package and look at dependencies. If the package has dependencies, be sure they can be met on the new node.

To move the package, first halt it where it is running using the cmhaltpkg command. This action not only halts the package, but also disables package switching.

After it halts, run the package on the new node using the #cmrunpkg command, then re-enable switching as described under “Start a Package”.

 
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CHANGING PACKAGE SWITCHING: enable or disable switching attributes for a cluster :
# cmmodpkg –e  (enable)
# cmmodpkg –d  (diable)
 

After a package has failed on one node, that node is disabled. This means the package will not be able to run on that node.

The following command will enable the package to run on the specified node.

# cmmodpkg –e -n
# cmmodpkg -e -n umhpux9 pkg1

Disabling a package from running on a particular node

# cmmodpkg -d -n
# cmmodpkg -d -n umhpux9 pkg1
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